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The Risk of Over Designing

Simplicity is often seen, but it's a concept that is not easily explained. For some graphic designers, it's second nature. For others, it involves much forethought. Today's designers are trending toward more simple, clutter-free designs, as they return to simplicity. Here are some examples of how the traditional theme of less is more is used:
  • Advertising
    Not only can simple ads grab attention, but their short and to the point messages are also easier to comprehend. The concept of "less is more" is especially effective when writing ad copy.

  • Catalogs and Brochures
    Catalogs and brochures are expected to be a vast source of information, yet readers appreciate when they are simplified, organized, and easy to read and comprehend. Simplicity is often its own reward since it encourages increased use.

  • Packaging
    Like a poster, a package needs to attract the eye within seconds of its initial viewing. In recent years, shelves have been jammed with products whose designers have attempted to out-design one another. This gives simple package designs featuring primary colors, bold copy, white space, and clean design the ability to effectively break through the clutter.

  • Identity
    Not only do logos convey the personality of a company, but they also offer a memorable impression. Simple designs that incorporate a company's complex ideas are the root of a logo's power.
One of the perks of being a designer is the ability to develop a personality or character for a company or product. For designers, simplicity means a return to basics, but not at the expense of creative design.



Less is More
by Steven Heller and Anne Fink

REVIEW
This book explores the emerging less is more attitude in graphic design through work and insight from 96 of today s hottest (and coolest) designers. A great variety of styles and points of view are represented, from such respected names as Art Chantry, Janet Froelich, and Stephen Doyle. Featured profiles examine the individual styles and influences of seven prominent designers. The book sets the stage with an insightful essay tracing the ebbs and flows of less and more through 500 years of graphic design.


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