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10 Ways to Create the Wrong Brochure

To be successful, a brochure needs to be produced with a precise objective and a target reader in mind. It's best to create the least elaborate brochure likely to achieve its objectives.

Deciding on Your Purpose
Brochures fall into two broad categories -- those that introduce a new product or service to a likely customer and those that turn an already interested customer into a buyer.

Using Color
Full color is more costly but is justified if the product or service you are offering needs color to show its features. For example, a wallpaper brochure or a brochure of knitwear would not work effectively in anything other than full color. Another reason for using full color may be to compete head-on with a rival's color brochure.



Using two or even three colors is a cheaper alternative to full color and can be quite effective, especially if part of the brochure is printed in a screened color that lightens the tone and gives the effect of another color.

A limited use of color can look more sophisticated than bold colors. You might also consider using full color in only part of a brochure, or you might try using colored paper -- although that is quite tricky to do well.

10 Ways to Create the Wrong Brochure
  1. Being concerned with the looks, but forgetting the sales objective.
  2. Giving the printer poor artwork, but expecting excellent results.
  3. Forgetting to emphasize the unique selling proposition of your business.
  4. Omitting (or hiding) prices if they are critical to the reader's decision-making.
  5. Printing too many brochures with details that date too quickly.
  6. Giving insufficient thought to how the brochure should best be distributed.
  7. Using text on the brochure that is too small to read easily.
  8. Including poor-quality or inappropriate illustrations.
  9. Allowing a fussy or complex design to distract from the key selling message.
  10. Forgetting to monitor the response (as with any other type of advertising).



Effective Marketing
by Peter Hingston

REVIEW
If you've always wished for a marketing guide that didn't take as long to read and digest as the actual marketing process itself, you'll love this itty-bitty crash course, which zooms in on four key areas: putting customers first, building strong products, maximizing publicity, and developing an overall strategy. On every page, boxed power tips, quickie case-studies, to-do checklists, and easy-to-follow flowcharts demystify the process. Granted, if you're looking for specific or in-depth guidance, you may find this book too general in its approach. But if you're looking for a thumbnail guide to the basics, it'll do just fine.


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